November 5th Colour Art

This is my first daily posting in which I will reflect on what inspires me in art.

As I recalled yesterday, I have a distinct Art Noveau influence to my sense of colour and design. I lean heavily on symbolism, and I especially love the depiction of the peacock feather, which somehow morphed into paisley, and its almost inevitable supernatural connotations. This motif came about as a result of the Art Nouveau movement.

To summarise, Art Noveau was a Europe wide phenomenon which occurred between 1890-1910. According to Wikipedia, it was “[a] reaction to academic art of the 19th century, it was inspired by natural forms and structures, not only in flowers and plants, but also in curved lines. Architects tried to harmonize with the natural environment.”

For me personally, the greatest influence of the Art Noveau movement is Glaswegian artist and designer, Charles Rennie Mackintosh. Of particular note is his rose motif, which strikes me as being more a symbol of a deeply held belief in the spiritual depths of romantic love rather than being a literal representation of a flower.

I hope I haven’t lost your attention with my metaphorical take on Art Noveau, and that you will enjoy looking at my pictures regardless.

Once again, thank you for reading.

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Autumn colour pallete

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Winter colour pallete

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Spring colour pallete

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Summer colour pallete

About Katie Hamer

I am a writer, an artist, a photographer, philosopher, interior designer, listener, and explorer.
This entry was posted in Colour Art, Magical realism and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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